CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS IN THE CUYAHOGA COUNTY ARCHIVES

The Journal of the Cuyahoga County Archives, Volume 2: 1983
Board of Cuyahoga County Commissioners
The Cuyahoga County Archives, Cleveland, Ohio

Cartographic records originally created by four separate Cuyahoga County officers are now maintained at the Cuyahoga County Archives. Cuyahoga County cartographic records in the holdings date from 1835 to 1979 and number about seven hundred and fifteen volumes, not including duplicates. These volumes include atlases, plat books, aerial, geologic, cemetery, ward and precinct maps, and other miscellaneous cartographic records. The maps are used to determine previous property ownership, changes in dimensions, and changes in boundary lines. This kind of information may be of be of value to county personnel, lawyers, business personnel, and to genealogists tracing familial histories. All Cuyahoga County cartographic records kept at the Cuyahoga County Archives are retained permanently because of their legal uses and historical value to researchers.

Some cartographic records have been or are now being redrawn. A sheet of acid-free paper is placed over an original map on a light table. It is then traced over in pencil. The reproductions are then labeled and stored I acid-free containers. In no instance, however, has an original cartographic record been destroyed. they are maintained as part of the permanent collections.

Financial administration of Cuyahoga County is the largest responsibility undertaken in three county offices, the office of the board of county commissioners, the office of the treasurer, and the office of the auditor. The auditor is the fiscal officer of Cuyahoga County.

Official aspects of the responsibilities of the auditorís office include the assessment of values of all real estate in Cuyahoga County for purposes of taxation and the preparation of complete tax lists of all land within the county. Such tax accounting is accomplished, in part, through the creation and continual updating of cartographic records. These cartographic records detail all real estate within Cuyahoga County. Auditorís property maps are organized largely according to political subdivisions and are periodically revised. The maps provide detailed information such as changes in ownership, dates of transfer, property dimensions, property boundary lines, and other items of interests.

The chief concern of the recorder is the protection of property rights. The recorder has the authority to plat all newly formed townships, villages, annexations, and proposed subdivisions in Cuyahoga County. The recorder receives and records deed transactions, mortgages, leases, and liens affecting title to real property. The recorder accepts and files chattel mortgages and records a variety of miscellaneous documents entitled to record. The recorder is not, however, required to determine the validity of such instruments. Recorderís maps show a variety of detailed information such as locations of public buildings, types of buildings(e.g., brick, wood, or stone), railway systems, and waterways.

One of the functions of the county engineer is to transcribe maps and plats establishing property boundaries within the county. The engineer is also responsible for mapping the construction or reconstruction of roads, bridges, ditches, and culverts. Examples of engineerís maps at the Cuyahoga County Archives include some aerial maps, the Geological Atlas of the State of Ohio (1879), and the Atlas of the City of Cleveland (1898),which is also an example of a recorderís map, although used for different purposes.

In Cuyahoga County the board of elections has the authority to supervise and conduct elections. Ward and precinct maps are employed to divide the county into its political subdivisions, then into ward and precincts or other electoral units by political subdivision. Accurately complied ward and precinct maps are maintained throughout each election.

A few cartographic records at the Cuyahoga County Archives are miscellaneous items which display different aspects of Cuyahoga County, the state of Ohio, the United States, and some foreign countries as well. Types of miscellaneous maps may be found in the inventories and descriptions which follow. Printed here are the cartographic inventories for the offices of the Cuyahoga County recorder, engineer, an the board of elections, and for the other miscellaneous cartographic materials at the Cuyahoga County Archives. The entire series description, including all cartographic materials, of the office of the Cuyahoga County auditor is also printed. This list includes some non-cartographic materials but is so extensive that it is inconvenient to provide that information elsewhere. In the case of the auditor a relation of the history of the office is presented. The history of the office of Cuyahoga County recorder is set forth in volume one of the Journal of the Cuyahoga County Archives, published in 1981

Robert L. White, Jr.

 

Cartographic Records of the County Recorder

1. Plat Maps 1-129, 132-178

June 8, 1850 to April 17, 1960. One hundred and seventy-six volumes. Volumes one hundred and thirty and one hundred and thirty-one are missing from this set and are presumed still to be with the office of origin. Ink drawings of proposed and actual subdivisions and allotments within Cuyahoga County are accompanied by copies of statements from county officials and property owners who dedicated their lands for public use and by official approvals and acceptances of plats. Entry numbers 13 through 22 in this series are duplicates of these plat maps.

2. Atlas of Cleveland

1898. Published by A. H. Mueller and Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This atlas shows locations of public buildings and types of buildings with information such as brick, wood, stone, one floor, two floors, schools, churches, mills, etc. The volume also records the locations of water pipes, sewers, fire hydrants, and steam railroads, as does the Engineerís Atlas of Cleveland (1898). The atlas is indexed alphabetically by name of street and alphabetically by name of subdivision or allotment.

3. Atlas of the Suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio

1898. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This atlas embraces Glenville, Collinwood, East Cleveland, South Brooklyn, Newburgh, Lakewood, Rockport, Brooklyn, and parts of Euclid and Warrensville. It shows streets, lots, buildings, allotments, waterways, house numbers, and names of property owners within these suburbs.

4. Registered Land Survey

1915. One volume.

There is one entry, a survey map of the property of a person named Mary Lahiff, dated May 28, 1915. The survey was done on the authority of a court order by the county surveyor.

5. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume One

1941, revised in 1950. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This volume embraces the cities of East Cleveland, South Euclid, Cleveland Heights, and University Heights. It has three indices. The first index is arranged alphabetically by name of political subdivision. The second is an alphabetical listing of allotments. The third is an alphabetical listing of street names within the volume.

Map sections display individual areas and coded symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, stables, house numbers, open streets and their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railroad tracks, and political subdivision boundary lines.

6. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Three

1950, revised in 1956, 1959, and 1962. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This volume embraces the cities Bedford, Garfield Heights, and Maple Heights, the villages of Bentleyville, Chagrin Falls, Glenwillow, Moreland Hills, Orange, Solon, and Woodmere, and the townships of Bedford and Chagrin Falls. The map sections display individual areas and coded symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, stables, house numbers, open streets and their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railway tracks, and political subdivisions boundary lines.

7. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Four

1956, revised in 1958. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This volume embraces the cities of Bay Village, Fairview Park, Lakewood, and Rocky River and the villages of Parkview and Westlake. The map sections display individual areas and coded symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, stables, house numbers, open streets and their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railway tracks, and political subdivision boundary lines.

8. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Five

1927, revised October 1, 1929 to April 1, 1931. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The areas covered include the northeast and southeast areas of Cuyahoga County. The map sections display individual areas and coded symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, open streets And their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railway tracks, and political subdivision boundary lines.

9. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Five

1927, revised in 1951, 1956, and 1959. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This volume embraces the city of Parma, the villages of Brooklyn, Brooklyn Heights, Cuyahoga Heights, Independence, Linndale. Newburgh Heights, Parma Heights, Seven Hills, and Valley View. The map sections show individual areas and coded symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, stables, house numbers, open streets and their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railway tracks, and political subdivision boundary lines.

10. Plat Book of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Six

1927, revised in 1957 and 1958. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This volume embraces the cities of Berea and North Olmsted, the villages of Brecksville, Broadview Heights, Brook Park, and Middleburgh Heights, and Olmsted Township. The map sections display individual areas and symbols and colors to depict frame, brick, stone or concrete, and iron-clad buildings, apartment houses, greenhouses, garages, stables, house numbers, open streets and their widths, state and federal route numbers, waterways, railway tracks, and political subdivision boundary lines.

11. Map of District Seven, East(Cleveland)

1937

12. Map of District Twenty-one, East (Cleveland), and the Shaker Heights City School District

1937

13. Maps and Volume One

1850-1854.

14. Maps, Volume Three

1863-1869.

15. Maps, Volume Four

1869-1871

16. Maps, Volume Five

1871-1873.

17. Maps, Volume Six

1873-1874.

18. Maps, Volume Seven

1873.

19. Maps, Volume Eight

1873-1874.

20. Maps, Volume Nine

1874-1875.

21. Maps, Volume Twenty

1893-1894.

22. Maps, Volume Twenty-one

1894-1896.

23. Map of South Euclid Village, Volume Three

1937.

24. Map of Cuyahoga County, West of River (West Park), Volume Six

August 1928 to October 1929.

25. Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Volume One

1932.

26. Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Volume Two, Northwest and Southwest

1938.

27. Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Volume One, Eastern Section

December 1924 to January 1927.

28. Plat Book of Cleveland, Ohio, Volume Two, Western Section

December 1924 to January 1927.

29. Plat Book of the City of Cleveland, Ohio, Volume Three

1933.

30. Atlas of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Volume Three

1920.

Cartographic Records of the County Engineer

1. Geological Atlas of the State of Ohio

1879. Published by the authority of the state of Ohio, J.S. Newberry, chief geologist.

An indefinite number of pages appear to be missing from this volume.

2. Atlas of Cuyahoga County

1892

This is an oversized volume showing sections of Cuyahoga County roads, buildings, original lots, public waterways, and allotments.

3. Atlas of the City of Cleveland

1898. Published by A.H. Mueller and Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

There is an alphabetical street index and an alphabetical index of subdivisions.

4. Map and Guide of Cuyahoga County

1935. Complied by John O. McWilliams, County Surveyor.

The map shows county and state roads and historical points of interests. There are some photographs and illustrations.

5. Map of Roads Eligible for County Motor Vehicle License Tax Expenditure

October 17, 1968. Complied by Albert S. Porter, Country Engineer. Existing and proposed state and county highways are shown on this map.

Cartographic Maps of the Board of Elections

1. Ward Map of the City of Cleveland, Ohio

1921. Copyright by the Board of Cuyahoga County Commissioners Drawn by the Wood Brothers, draftsmen.

Each Cleveland ward is shown separately. Each ward shows its perfect letter and streets names and numbers. There are three sets of this map in the Cuyahoga County Archives.

Miscellaneous Maps

1. Ward Map of the City of Cleveland

This map shows the boundaries of the wards of Cleveland between 1875 and 1886 and circa 1894 to 1903.

The boundary lines of the political subdivisions of Cleveland, Brooklyn, West Cleveland, and East Cleveland are also shown as well as some street names. This is not a map of the board of elections.

2. Ward Map of the City of Cleveland

January 1972, Published by the division of engineering and construction of the city of Cleveland.

There are thirty-four pages, each showing one ward, its precincts, street names, and numbers as well as symbols locating United Torch-funded health and social service agencies.

3. Map of the Cleveland Trading Area

Undated. Map number 11043.

Copyright by the American Map Company, Incorporated, New York and distributed by Burrows in Cleveland.

The Cleveland trading area shown on this map consists of the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Illinois, and the province of Ontario, Canada.

4. Cleveland Metro Area Map

August 1979. Published by Metro Graphic Arts, Incorporated, of Grand Rapids, Michigan. Northern Ohio, its highways, streets, political subdivisions, and certain topographic features are shown here.

5. Map of Historical Sites and Other Points of Interest in Northern Ohio

Undated. Two sets, each containing six pages. The exact origin and date of the maps cannot be determined; however, the compilation is believed to be from the mid- 1970ís.

The maps show historical sites and other points of interest such as the Arcade. Blossom Music Center, Lorenzo Carter Cabin reproduction, Cleveland Play House, Coliseum, Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area, Franklin Castle, Franklin Circle, Graysí Armory, Hale Farm and Western Reserve Village, Karamu House, Metropolitan Park Ranger Station, Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Randall Mall, Robert Russell Rhodes House, Rocky River Reservation, Rose Hill Farm, Nelson Sandford House, Severance Hall, Shaker Historical Museum, Soldiersí and Sailorsí Monument, South Chagrin Reservation, St. Agnes Church Tower, St. Theodosius Russian Orthodox Cathedral, Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, West Side Market, and others.

6. Map of Berea, Ohio

1879. A.J. Howey, cartographer; W.J. Morgan and Company, lithographers, Cleveland. Published by the Union Map Publishing Company of Cleveland.

7. Map of Census Tracts in Clevelandís Cuyahoga County

Real Property Inventory, copyright 1961 by the Commercial Survey Company of Cleveland.

8. Orthophotography Index Map

1978. Copyright by the Board of Cuyahoga County Commissioners; prepared by Graphco, Base Source Division, Cleveland.

Orthography is a type of photography which combines conventional line map accuracy with the detail of an aerial photograph. The process removes photographic and terrain distortions from the finished map. Orthophotographs may be obtained with or without topographic information and can be reproduced in especially made formats. This particular index map shows an overview of Cuyahoga County and its political subdivisions divided into two hundred and five squares. The outline of topographic features is shown within the squares.

9. Ancestral Map of Cleveland

Compiled by Edmund Emmet OíDaly and Dennis John OíNeil and copyright by them, 1948. Printed by ideal Reproduction, Cleveland.

This map includes keys itself and reference sources.

10. Map of the Cuyahoga River

1982. Compiled and drawn by Christopher C. Wayne of the Cuyahoga County Archives.

The map shows the course of the Cuyahoga River and the northeastern Ohio counties it traverses as well as other sites; Cuyahoga, Lake, Geauga, Medina, Summit, and Portage counties; the cites of Cleveland, Mentor, Hudson, Peninsula, Akron, Ravenna, and Kent; Fairport Harbor, Lake Erie, and the several tributaries of the Cuyahoga River.

11. Ward Map of the City of Cleveland

1968.

This Map also shows police districts of Cleveland.

12. Real Estate Atlas of Cuyahoga County, Ohio

1973 to 1976. Ten volumes. Published by Real Estate Data, Incorporated, Miami, Florida.

A map index is provided for dividing the county into smaller areas, not necessarily by political subdivision. An aerial photograph on the left half of each page shows an area which is closely defined in the map on the right half. Features shown on the map include the locations of schools, churches, gas and oil wells, airports, United States military installations, sand and gravel pits, radio towers, lighthouses, sewage disposal sites, waterways, water tanks, golf courses, pipelines, drive-in theatres, shopping centers, and public thoroughfares.

13. Veterans Cemetery Plat Book

Undated. Compiled by the Works Progress Administration, project number 66-423-3-232.

There is a map index of cemeteries and crematories, A brief history of each cemetery and an accompanying legend is included for each map. There are lists known soldiers and possible unknown soldiers given for each cemetery. The time span of the entries in the volume is from the Revolutionary War to World I. There are one hundred and eighteen cemeteries and four crematories represented in this large volume of four hundred and ninety-pages.

14. Plan of the City of Cleveland

1835.

This is a copy from the Library of Congress.

Notes

1. See the inventories of the cartographic holdings in the series description of records of the Cuyahoga County auditor.

2. For more specific information one should refer to the county office records retention schedules of the Cuyahoga County Archives; these schedules have been established by the Cuyahoga records commission pursuant to section 149.38 of the Ohio Revised Code. Other information is available in Ohio County Records Manual, published by the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus in 1977. Part four of that manual is concerned with county office records retention schedules. General information on the process of establishing theses schedules appears on pp. 8-10; material on the ward and precinct maps of the board of elections appears on p. 47; material on the tax maps (plat books) of the county auditor is on p. 100; material on the plat books of the county engineer appears on p. 127, and material about the plat books of the county recorder appears on p. 144.

3. "An act to create the offices of a territorial treasurer, and of an auditor of public records," in The status of Ohio and of the Northwestern Territory, Adopted or Enacted from 1788 to 1833 Inclusive, Together with the Ordinance of 1787, the Constitutions of Ohio and of the United States, and Various Public Instruments and Acts of Congress, ed. Salmon P. Chase (Cincinnati: Corey and Fairbank, 1833-35),I, 231-33. All following references to this work will cite Chase with the volume and page numbers.

4. "An act of prescribing the duties of county auditors," in Chase, III, 1807-15

5. "An act regulating the duties of county auditors and county commissioners," in Chase, II, 1194-95

6. "An act to create the offices of a territorial treasurer, and of an auditor of public records," in Chase, I, 231-33

7. "An act prescribing the duties of county auditors," in Chase, III, 1807-15

8. "A law establishing the recorderís office, I, 167-68

9. "An act to provide for the recording of town plats," in Chase, I, 502

10. "An act to provide for the election of county recorders and prescribing their duties," in Chase, III, 1842-43

11. Guide to County Archives in Ohio (Cleveland: Works Progress Administration, Division of Womenís and Professional Projects, District Four, 1937), 18, xi

12. "An act to create the office of county surveyor and defining the duties thereof," in Chase, I, 368-69

13. ibid.

14. Guide to County Archives in Ohio, 18, 274

 


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