The Records of the Cuyahoga County Auditor:

the Office and a Series Description

 

Introduction

The permanent records from the auditorís office maintained by the Cuyahoga County Archives date from 1819 to 1978. The materials preserved include maps, tax duplicates, annual reports, payroll, burial and bounty records, and assessment books. Two particularly significant and useful series of auditorís records maintained by the Archives are the property maps, 1860 to 1938, and tax duplicates, 1819 to 1869. These volumes record vital information about property boundaries and ownership, land values, and real estate taxes that provides invaluable documentation of the growth and development of Cuyahoga County. There are approximately sixteen hundred volumes of auditorís records in the Cuyahoga County Archives; all of the documents are public records available without restriction.

Agency History

The office of county auditor is perhaps the most complex of all the county offices. The auditor has acquired, as have the county commissioners, a variety of duties not elsewhere designated by statute. He serves as the countyís chief fiscal officer and must account for the more than seven hundred million dollars received by Cuyahoga County annually. The treasurer actually collects and pays out all county funds, but payments of county funds cannot be made except through the warrant of the auditor. The auditor pays all county obligations, including the distribution of funds to municipalities, school districts, library systems, and other governmental agencies within the county. This fiscal officer is also responsible for the appraisal and assessment of all real and personal property in the county and prepares the tax duplicate for real, personal, and inheritance taxes. The auditor is the secretary of the budget commission, a member of the board of revision, and of the board of trustees of the sinking fund when one exists. His office also issues many licenses required by statute, including dog, vendors, and cigarette licenses.

The origins of the office of county auditor can be found in the laws of the Northwest Territory. An act adopted in 1799 first provided that an auditor of public accounts be appointed by the territorial governor. It was the officer's duty to receive and to liquidate all accounts against the territory and to certify to the treasurer the amount due the territory. The auditor of public accounts was required to maintain all accounts and vouchers, an account of the treasureís receipts and certificates, and copies of the warrants that he issued on the treasurer. The Ohio construction of 1802 called for a state auditor, to be chosen every three years by a joint ballot of both houses of the General Assembly. The next year a statute required the state auditor to perform all the duties required of the auditor of public accounts of the Northwest Territory and to serve as the auditor of each Ohio county.

A law passed February 2, 1821 provided that the county auditor should serve as clerk of the board of county commissioners. Three years later another statute made, the office of county auditor elective for a term of two years. This same act then also charged the auditor with keeping an accurate record of the corporate proceedings of the county commissioners, with examining and allowing all account debts and demands chargeable to the county, and with making out alphabetical duplicates of the county tax as assessed by the commissioners of the county.

In 1838 an act passed made the auditor county superintendent of common schools. An 1840 measure created a county board of equalization, to consist of the county auditor, county assessor, and the county commissioners. The board was to meet annually for the purpose of hearing complaints, equalizing assessments, and revaluing all real and personal property within the county. In 1845 an act provided that taxes be levied on real and personal property, specifying that a portion of the taxes appropriated by the act be used for the construction, and a portion for the maintenance, of free turnpike roads. An act of 1846 made the county auditor, in place of the county commissioners, the county sealer of weights and measures. In 1849 an act affecting public schools was passed establishing district boards of education and removing from the county auditor the office of superintendent of common schools. All expenditures for school sites or construction, however, had to be certified to the county auditor and assessed and collected in each school district. A measure of 1853 provided that the county commissioners should empower the county auditor to contract for repairs or improvements on public buildings or grounds, so long as the cost did not exceed fifty dollars. The auditor and the commissioners were also required to determine annually the amount to be raised for various county purposes; the law further stipulated that the auditor should ascertain the net amount collected for each purpose, none of which was to be diverted to other uses. In 1856 a measure was adopted which provided that no money should be disbursed except by the county treasurer upon the warrant of the county auditor.

Four measures passed in 1858 had special impact on the auditorís office. One act gave the auditor power to appoint a deputy and another specified that money could only be paid in to the county on the auditorís draft, with the the exception of taxes charged on the tax duplicate. A third statute allowed for the semi-annual payment and accounting of taxes, and a final measure required the auditor and treasurer to make a joint quarterly financial report to be published in a newspaper with the general circulation.

The ensuing years saw the auditorís responsibilities continue to grow. In 1861 a statute gave the auditor the duty of submitting to the state auditor, on a annual basis, a list of all deaf, dumb, blind, insane, and idiotic persons in the county. In 1862 it became the auditorís responsibility to grant state licenses to peddlers. Eight years later another statute was enacted calling upon the directors of each county infirmary to organize a school for the benefit of all school-age inmates and required that the auditor transfer to the poor fund a proportionate amount of school funds. The county auditor became responsible for the maintenance of maps in 1872 when a statute directed the county commissioners to require the surveyor to prepare maps and plats of the original surveys in a format suitable for preservation an stipulated that such material be stored in the auditorís office. The term of the auditorís office was extended to three years in 1877 and another measure passed that year required the county auditor to file annually with the state auditor a report of all sheep killed by dogs.

In 1882 the first measure to provide for the taxation of persons engaged in the sale of intoxicating liquors was adopted. The assessors of personal property made lists of such persons to be turned in to the county auditor for assessment. A bill passed in 1891 provided for the meeting of the decennial board of equalization of Cuyahoga County as a board of revision. In 1892 the county auditor was made secretary of the newly created board of equalization of the city of Cleveland; he was also authorized to appoint a ditch commissioner, whose duty it would be to keep ditches clear.

The first act of taxation of cigarettes was passed in 1893, when the county auditor was authorized to assess the amount of tax. The cigarette tax was amended in 1894, lowering the tax rate and prohibiting the enclosing of a picture or coupon as a premium with the package.

In 1902 all city boards of equalization and revision were abolished and one city board of review was established, which was to meet annually, with the county auditor as secretary.

The duties of the auditor in regard to taxation were augmented in the early part of this century. An act of 1911 provided that the county auditor should transmit quadrennially to the state tax commission an abstract of the real property of each taxing district of his county. Two years later the state tax commission was required to direct and supervise the assessment for taxation of all real and personal property in the state, with the aid of district assessors to be appointed by the governor. In each assessment district the state tax commission annually appointed a district board of complaint, composed of three members, of which the county auditor was to be secretary. In 1915 the offices of district assessors and the district boards of complaint were abolished and the county auditor was made the chief assessing officer of the county, both for real and personal property. In 1917 the county auditor became the assessor of all real estate in the county. In addition, the auditor, the treasurer, an the president of the board of county commissioners were to constitute the new board of revision, which was to meet annually.

Certain duties were imposed by statute upon the county auditor in 1917 in respect to the registration and licensing of dogs and dog kennels, the issuance of certificates of registration and transfer of ownership, and the keeping of a permanent record in a dog and kennel register. In 1919 the county auditor was made the inheritance tax appraiser for the county. Another enactment of that year provided that in each county having a bonded indebtedness there should be a board, designated as trustees of the sinking fund, composed of the auditor, treasurer, and prosecutor, to provide for the payment of interest on all bonds issued by the county. The county auditorís term of office was changed to four years in 1921 and his salary was made proportional to the population of a county, although it could not exceed six thousand dollars annually.

In 1927 a statute was passed which created in each county a budget commission consisting of a countyís auditor, treasurer, and prosecutor, with the auditor acting as secretary. It was to meet annually for the purpose of adjusting the rate of taxation and of fixing the amount of taxes to be levied each year. Its decisions were to be determined by the amount of taxable property shown on the auditorís duplicate or by the auditorís estimate.

In 1933 a bill, popularly known as the Anna bill, was passed to provide direct housing relief to indigent persons. Although the clerk of the board of county commissioners was designated by this law as the officer to whom the commissioners were to delegate the administration of such relief, the county auditor was given the duty of issuing tax warrants to the landlords and of deducting the amount represented by them from that due each taxing subdivision.

This introduction to the history of the office of county auditor has been summarized from the Guide to County Archives in Ohio, volume eighteen (Cuyahoga County) produced and published in 1937 as part of the Historical Records Survey of the Works Progress Administration. That work should be consulted for more detailed descriptions of the historical development of the office of county auditor; the most current edition of the Ohio Revised Code should be consulted for the additional administrative duties which have been placed upon that office in recent years.

Judith G. Cetina

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

Note: The drawings are lost on several maps listed among the records of the Cuyahoga County auditor (particular entry numbers 5, 8, 10, 12, 13, 15, 19, 20, 22, 26, 28, 34, 35, 36, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 63, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 80, 83, 84, 85, 87, 88, 91, 92, 94, 95, 97, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, and 111) ordinarily include the original lot, sublot, or tract numbers, the dimensions of the property, the number of acres, the names of owners, and the dates of transfers of title. The presence of a structure on a lot is often depicted by a small square identified by the letters H (for house) or B (for barn) or the word "shed." Dollar values are often printed beneath that symbol.

In addition, the property map volumes for 1860 (specifically entry numbers 15, 26, 45, and 60) contain, besides the information mentioned above, an assessment of land record that lists for parcel of land a description of the property, the ownerís name, the number of acres, the value per acre, the value of land and buildings, the total value of land, and the number of acres in plow land, meadow, and wood.

1. Albion, Olmstead Village; South Part., Olmstead Village; North Part, Rockport; Section Twenty-three, Berea Village; Lot One, Brighton; Brooklyn Village; Newburgh Township; Lot Three hundred and fifteen, Newburgh Village; Newburgh Township; Bedford Village, and Chagrin Falls Village. 1870. One volume. The map sections in this volume are arranged in the order listed in the title. Each political subdivisions is arranged by the original lot numbers contained therein. See entry 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 2X, 26, 27, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 60, 6X, 67, 69, 70, and 75.

2. Annual Report of the County Commissioners and Auditor. 1902 to 1943. Forty-two volumes. The volumes are arranged in chronological order by year.

The reports provide a detailed summary of the receipts and disbursements of county funds that includes the board of county commissioners budget, tax levies, and the funds necessary for the year. See the inventory for the board of county commissioners records and, specifically, the series descriptions for the Annual Report of the County Commissioners and Auditor for the years 1890 to 1901.

3. Atlas of Cuyahoga County 1874. One column. Published by Titus, Simmons, and Titus, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The maps for the city of Cleveland are arranged by wards and there are also maps for each Cuyahoga County township. Maps of towns and villages are also included. The atlas also has a table of contents.

The map sections show individual lot, lot numbers, and dimensions, and may also include names of owners, street names, and the names of schools, churches, and businesses. the presence of a structure on a lot is indicated by a rectangle. The atlas also contains census charts, a map of the state of Ohio by counties, and several illustrations of homes of prominent citizens. See City Atlas of Cleveland, Ohio, 1881, entry number 23.

4. Atlas of Ward Nine 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map of Ward Nine and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. Unarranged. The atlas consists of drawings of the lots of land in Ward Nine, which included the area known as Ohio City.

5. Bedford 1870.Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy. An index map on page one indicates the location of Bedford lots in 1870. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 35.

6. Bedford 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. For a description see Bedford, 1870, entry number 5. Also see entry numbers 1, 7, 8, 9,and 35.

7. Bedford 1890 to 1915. One volume. For a description see Bedford, 1870, entry number5. See also entry numbers 1, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 35.

8. Bedford Village 1890 to 1910.One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Bedford lots during the years 1890 to 1910.The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 5, 6, 7, 9,and 35

9. Bedford Heights Village, Chagrin Falls Village, Glenville Village, West Cleveland Village, Brooklyn Heights Village, Berea City, and Olmstead Falls Village 1880.One volume. The map sections in this volumes are arranged in the order listed in the title. Each political subdivision is arranged by the original lot numbers contained therein. See entry numbers 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 35, 41, 55, 56, 57, 74, and 83.

10. Berea and Olmstead Falls 1890 to 1920.One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the location of Berea and Olmstead Falls lots during the years 1890 to 1920. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers, 1,9, 26,27,55, and 56.

11. Bounty Record July 23, 1862 to September 30, 1862. One volume. This volume is arranged by military organization, for example, the Seventh Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the Forty-first Volunteer Infantry, and the One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and then chronologically by date of enlistment.

Entries recorded in this volume include name of enlistee, address, ward number, date of bounty certificate, receipt of bounty, amount of bounty, usually ten dollars, and remarks.

12. Bratenahl Village 1890.One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Bratenahl lots in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots.

13. Brecksville 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga Country Archives. An index map on page one indicates the location of Brecksville lots in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of individual lots. See entry numbers 14, 60,and 69.

14. Brecksville 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Brecksville lots in 1890. The index if followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Brecksville, 1880, entry number 13. Also see entry numbers 60 and 69.

15. Brooklyn 1860. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Brooklyn lots in 1860. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 74.

16. Brooklyn 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of Brooklyn lots in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Brooklyn, 1860, entry number 15. Also see entry numbers 1, 9, 16, 18, 19, and 74.

17. Brooklyn 1890 to 1900. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Brooklyn lots during the years 1890 to 1900. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Brooklyn, 1860, entry number 15. Also see entry numbers 1, 9, 16, 17, 19, and 74.

19. Brooklyn Village 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Brooklyn lots in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 74.

20. Chagrin Falls (Township) 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Chagrin Falls Township in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 21, 22, and 57.

21. Chagrin Falls Township 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Chagrin Falls Township in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Chagrin Falls (Township), 1880, entry numbers 20. Also see entry numbers 1, 9, 22, and 57.

22. Chagrin Falls Village 1890 to 1900. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Chagrin Falls Village lots during the years 1890 to 1900. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 20, 21, and 57.

23. City Atlas of Cleveland, Ohio 1881. One volume. Published by the G.M. Hopkins Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The map sections are generally arranged by wards. The volume is not indexed.

The map sections show individual lots, lot numbers, and dimensions, and may also include names of owners, street names, and the names of schools, churches, and businesses. The presence of a structure on a lot is indicated by a rectangle. Color is used to differentiate frame from brick buildings. A special explanation key clearly defines all symbols used on the map. Pages one to four-teen are missing. See Atlas of Cuyahoga County, 1874, entry number 3.

24. District Seven, East (Cleveland) 1937. One volume. An index map, followed by plat sections showing areas of District Seven, East, in 1937.

25. District Twenty-one East and the Shaker School District 1937. One volume. There is an index map followed by plat sections showing areas of District Twenty-one, East, and of the Shaker school district in 1937.

26. Dover-Olmsted-Olmsted Falls-Rockport-Middleburgh-Strongsville-Berea-Albion 1860. One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the location of lots in Dover, Olmsted, Olmsted Falls, Rockport, Middleburgh, Strongsville, Berea, and Albion in 1860. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 10, 27, 28, 29, 49, 50, 55, 56, 66, 67, 68, 76, 77, and 78.

27. Dover-Olmsted-Rockport-Middleburgh 1870. One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the location of lots in Dover, Olmsted, Rockport, and Middleburgh in 1870.

The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Dover-Olmsted-Olmsted Falls-Rockport-Middleburgh-Strongsville-Berea-Albion, 1860, entry number 26. Also see entry numbers 1, 9, 28, 29, 49, 50, 55, 56, 66, 67, and 68.

28. Dover 1880.Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Dover in 1880.

The index is follow by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 26, 27, and 29.

29. Dover 1890 to 1910. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Dover during the years 1890 to 1910. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Dover, 1880, entry number 28. Also see entry numbers 26and 27.

30. East Cleveland 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in East Cleveland in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. In this volume part of the Village of Collinwood appears in the East Cleveland map on pages two to sixteen. See entry numbers 31, 32, 33, and 57.

31. East Cleveland 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in East Cleveland I 1890.

The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see East Cleveland, 1880, entry number 30. Also see entry numbers 32, 33, and 57.

32. East Cleveland, South Part 1900 to 1942. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in East Cleveland, the south part, during years 1900 to 1942. For a description see East Cleveland, 1880, entry number 30. Also see entry numbers 31, 33, and 57.

33. East Cleveland Village and Township, North Part 1900. One volume. There is and index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in East Cleveland Village and Township, the north part, in 1900. For a description see East Cleveland, 1880, entry number 30. Also see entry numbers 31, 32, and 57.

34. East View Village 1906 to 1921. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in East View Village during the years 1906 to 1921. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. East View Village was entirely incorporated into Shaker Heights after 1921.

35. Euclid-Warrensville-Bedford-Mayfield 1870.One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the locations of lots in Euclid, Warrensville, Bedford, and Mayfield in 1870.

The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 36 37, 38, 39, 45, 46, 47,48, 75, 80, 81, and 82.

36. Euclid 1870. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Euclid in 1870. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 35, 37, 38, 39, and 75.

37. Euclid 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Euclid in 1880.

The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Euclid, 1870, entry number 36. Also see entry numbers 35, 38, 39, and 75.

38. Euclid Township 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Euclid Township in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Euclid, 1870, entry number 36. Also se entry numbers 35, 37, 39, and 75. This map shows areas of Euclid Township which were detached to form the villages of Claribel, Euclid, South Euclid, and Euclidville.

39. Euclid (Village) 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Euclid Village in 1890.

The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 35, 36, 37, 38, and 75.

40. Fairview Village 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Fairview Village in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry number 42.

41. Glenville Village 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Glenville Village in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry number 9.

42. Goldwood Township 1890.One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Goldwood Township in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. This map also shows that areas of the original township were annexed to the village of West View, Fairview, and Rocky River. See entry numbers 40 and 68.

43. Independence 1890 to 1922. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Independence during the years 1890 to 1922. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 60, 69, and 70.

44. Lakewood 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Lakewood in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers. 1, 26, 27, 66, and 67.

45. Mayfield and Gates Mills 1860. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy. Index maps at the beginning of each section indicate the location of lots in Mayfield and Gates Mills in 1860. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. Gates Mills was formed from a section of the interior of Mayfield. Gates Mills became separate on December 7, 1921. Mayfield Township is no longer in existence. The villages of Gates Mills, Lyndhurst, Highland Heights, Mayfield, and Mayfield Heights were formed from the original Mayfield Township territory. See entry numbers 35, 46, 47, and 48.

46. Mayfield 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Mayfield in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 35, 45, 47, and 48.

47. Mayfield Township, Tract one, Volume Three 1890 to 1900. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in tract one of Mayfield Township during the years 1890to 1900. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots.

This map shows areas detached from Mayfield Township to form the village of Highland Heights. See entry numbers 35, 45, 46, and 48.

48. Mayfield Township, Tracts Two and Three (Gates Mills) 1890 to 1910. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in tracts two and three of Mayfield Township that were detached to form Gates Mills during the years 1890 to 1910. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 35, 45, 46, and 47.

49. Middleburgh 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Middleburgh in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. A list of owners in Linndale appears on page twenty-eight of the original Middleburgh map and on page twenty-eight of the redrawn copy. Seen entry numbers 26, 27,and 50.

50. Middleburgh Village, Including Brookpark Village 1890 to 1921. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Middleburgh and Brookpark villages during the years 1890 to 19212. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 26, 27, and 49.

51. Municipal Special Assessments 1941 to 1976. Four hundred and twenty-seven volumes. The volumes are arranged in chronological order by year. There is more than one political subdivision listed in each volume, except for the city of Cleveland volumes. Each volume is alphabetically by the name of the political subdivision. Entries recorded by the special assessments volumes are arranged numerically by permanent parcel number.

The entries provide information on the original lot number, sublot number, name of subdivision or allotment, number of front feet, number of acres, amount of principal on the assessment, amount of interest, and total assessment. The entries also record the amount of the annual installment and the nature of the assessments, e.g., street lights, sewer maintenance, water usage, or trees.

52. Newburgh 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives., dated July 8, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Newburgh in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 53, 54, 60, and 69.

53. Newburgh Heights Village and Willow Township 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Newburgh Heights Village an Willow Township in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 52, 54, 60, and 69.

54. Newburgh Village 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Newburgh Village in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 52, 53, 60, and 69.

55. Olmsted 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Olmsted in 1880. The index is followed by more detail views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1,9,10,26,27,and 56.

56. Olmsted 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Olmsted in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Olmsted, 1880, entry number 55. Also see entry numbers 1,9,10,26,and 27.

57. Orange-Solon-Chagrin Falls-East Cleveland 1870. One volume. There is an index map at the beginning of each section to indicate the location of lots in Orange, Solon, Chagrin Falls, and East Cleveland in 1870. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 33, 58, 59, 72, and 73.

58. Orange 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Orange in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 57 and 59.

59. Orange and Hunting Valley Village 1890. One volume. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Orange and Hunting Valley Village in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of individual lots. For a description see Orange, 1880, entry number 58. Also see entry number 57.

60. Parma-Royalton-Newburgh-Newburgh Village-Independence-Brecksville 1860. One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the location of lots in Parma, Royalton, Newburgh, Newburgh Village, Independence, and Brecksville in 1860. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 13, 14, 43, 52, 53, 54, 61, 62, 63, 69, 70, and 71.

61. Parma 1870. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Parma in 1870. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 60, 62,and 63.

62. Parma 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Parma in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Parma, 1870, entry number 61. Also see entry numbers 60 and 63.

63. Parma Heights Village 1890 to 1916. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of tracts and lots in Parma Heights Village during years 1890 to 1916.

The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See numbers 60, 61,and 62.

64. Payroll Records October 16, 1899 to December 17, 1978. Nine hundred and forty-eight volumes and six containers. The payroll record volumes are arranged chronologically by year. The volumes are then arranged by county departments within each year For some years there are several departments listed in an individual volume. For example, in 1958 one volume covers the airport, court of appeals. auditor, child welfare board and Blossom Hill, and another volume covers the court of common pleas court judges, coroner, dog warden, detention home, probate court, and the prosecuting attorney. The payroll records for other departments may span several years. In 1943, for instance, the payroll records for the engineerís office include two volumes; in 1970 the payroll records for elected officials include ten volumes; 1977 the payroll records in the welfare department include twelve volumes, and in 1978 the C.E.T.A. payroll records were combined into twenty-one volumes. The payroll records for each departments are divided into the months of the year(from January to December), and each month is subdivided into first second half pay periods. Names of county employees are arranged alphabetically by the surnames of persons in each department for all pay periods during the year.

Types of information recorded in payroll records vary in different time periods. Information recorded in the earliest payroll records include name of employee, rate of pay per hours or day or month, and gross pay per month. Later records provide name of employee, total pay per half month, and total pay per year. More advanced record keeping insured the recording of name of employee, retirement tax(P.E.R.S.), federal withholding tax, amount of overtime pay, county or state tax, municipal tax, gross pay per half month and year, net pay per half month and year, social security number, employee number, and county agency number.

Payroll records are available for personnel in the following departments: county agency group homes, airport, the auditor, Blossom Hill School, board of county commissioners board of elections, board of health, board of mental retardation, board of revision, clerk of courts, Cleveland Boys School, Comprehensive Employment and Training Act employees, coroner, county soil and water conservation, court of common pleas judges, custodian, data processing, dog warden, elected officials, engineer, juvenile court, metropolitan park board, nursing home, probate court, prosecutor, recorder, regional planning, sanitary engineer, sheriff, Soldiersí and Sailorsí Monument commission, soldiers relief commission, treasurer, welfare, youth services, and all other county offices.

65. Record of Committee on Burial of Ex-Union Soldiers October 134, 1895 to December 12, 1953. Twenty-seven volumes. The volumes in this collection are arranged in numerical order. The entries in each volume are arranged chronologically by the date of death.

These volumes were originally kept for ex-Union soldiers, sailors, and marines, honorably discharged, who died within Cuyahoga County, Ohio, without leaving sufficient means to defray funeral costs. This provision was passed in the Ohio General Assembly on April 1, 1884. An amendment was passed in 1893 to include the mother, wife, or widow of any honorably discharge ex-Union soldier, sailor, or marine, and any army nurse who served at any time in the United States army.

The information recorded in each entry includes the name of decedent and rank at discharge, company, regiment, date of death, name of cemetery, occupation, cost of funeral expenses (for example, clothing, coffin, hearse, carriage), funeral service, cemetery lot, interment, and incidentals. Other types of information recorded in each entry include date of report, date of approval, amount of expenses, amount of reward, voucher number, signature of county auditor, ward number, and names of committee members.

66. Rockport 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Rockport in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 26,27,67,and 68.

67. Rockport 1890 to 1900. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Rockport during the years 1890 to 1900. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Rockport, 1880, entry number 66. Also se entry numbers 1, 26, 27, and 68.

68. Rocky River Village 1900 to 1921. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Rocky River Village during the years 1900 to 1921. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1,26,27,42,66,and 67.

69. Royalton-Newburgh-Independence-Brecksville 1870. One volume. There are index maps at the beginning of each section to indicate the locations of lots in Royalton, Newburgh, Independence, and Brecksville in 1870. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 13, 14, 43, 52, 53, 54, 60, 70,and 71.

70. Royalton and Independence 1880. Four volumes. There are two original map volumes and two redrawn copies by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977.

There are index maps to indicate the location of lots in Royalton and Independence in 1880. The index maps are followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 43,60,69,and 71.

71. Royalton 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Royalton in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 60,69,and 70.

72. Solon 1870. One volume and a redrawn copy in progress. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Solon in 1870. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 57 and 73.

73. Solon 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated August 30, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots n Solon in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 57 and 72.

74. Solon 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in Solon in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Solon, 1880, entry number 73. Also see entry number 57.

75. South Brooklyn Village 1890. One volume. Thee is an index map on page one to indicate the location of South Brooklyn Village lots in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 1, 9, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19.

76. South Euclid Village, Volume Three 1937. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of South Euclid Village lots in 1937. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 35, 36, 37, 38, and 39.

77. Strongsville 1870. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy. An index map on page one indicates the location of Strongsville lots in 1870. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry numbers 26,78, and 79.

78. Strongsville 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of lots in Strongsville in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Strongsville, 1870, entry number 77. Also see entry numbers 26 and 79.

79. Strongsville 1890 to 1922. One volume. There is an index map on page one that indicates the location of lots in Strongsville during the years 1890 to 1922. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Strongsville, 1870, entry number 77. Also see entry numbers 26 and 78.

80. Tax Duplicates 1819 to 1869, not inclusive. One hundred and fifteen volumes. The volumes are arranged chronologically by year. For each year there are volumes that describe property within the city of Cleveland and volume that describe property outside Cleveland but within Cuyahoga County. The volumes for the city of Cleveland are identified as Cleveland, East of River and Cleveland, West of the River, or are identified by Cleveland ward number. The volumes for those areas outside of the city of Cleveland are identified by the name of the township or village. The entries within the volumes are arrange alphabetically by the surnames of property owners.

Types of information recorded in these volumes include descriptions of real property such as township number, tract number, name of subdivision, original lot number, sublot number, name or number of street, number of acres, number of front feet, tax valuations, and taxes paid. Also included are descriptions of personal property, such s numbers of dogs, cattle, chickens, horses, tax valuations, and taxes paid. See the inventory for the Cuyahoga County treasurerís records, and, specifically, the series description for the treasurerís tax duplicates, 1827 to the present, in the Journal of the Cuyahoga County Archives, volume one, page seventy-seven.

81. Warrensville 1880. Two volumes. There is an original map and a redrawn copy by Spencer C. Kimball of the Cuyahoga County Archives, dated July 7, 1977. An index map on page one indicates the location of Warrensville lots in 1880. The index is followed by more detailed views of the original lots. See entry numbers 35,82,and 83.

82. Warrensville 1890 to 1910. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of Warrensville lots during the years 1890 to 1910. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. For a description see Warrensville, 1880, entry number 80. Also see entry numbers 35 and 83.

This map shows areas formerly in Warrensville Township that were detached to form the villages of Idlewood, East View, South Newburgh, and North Randall. Part of Warrensville shown on this map was annexed to the city of Cleveland and to the village of Cleveland Heights.

83. Warrensville Township Miscellaneous Maps 1923 to 1925. One volume. See entry numbers 35, 81, and 82.

84. West Cleveland 1890. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of lots in West Cleveland in 1890. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots. See entry number 9.

85. West Park, Volumes One and Two 1895 to 1916. One volume. There is an index map on page one to indicate the location of West Park lots during the years 1895 to 1916. The index is followed by more detailed views of the individual lots.

86. Ward One (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward One. See entry number 87.

87. Wards One, Two, Three, and Four (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards One, Two, Three, and Four. For a description see Ward One, 1880, entry number 85. Also see entry numbers 88,89,and 90.

88. Wards Two and Three (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Two and Three. See entry number 87.

89. Wards Four, Five, and Seven (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Four, Five, and Seven. The maps also show portions of the Cuyahoga River and the Ohio Canal. See entry numbers 90, 91, and 92.

90. Ward Four (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Four. For a description see Wards Four, Five, and Seven, 1870, entry number 89. These maps also show the Eric Street Cemetery and portions of the Cuyahoga River and the Ohio Canal. See entry number 87.

91. Ward Five (Cleveland)1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Five. For description see Wards Four, Five, and Seven, entry number 89. Also see entry number 92.

92. Wards Five, Six, Seven, and Eight (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Five, Six, Seven, and Eight. See entry numbers 89, 91, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 97.

93. Wards Six, Fourteen, and Fifteen (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Six, Fourteen, and Fifteen. The maps of Wards Six, Fourteen, and Fifteen also show portions of the Cuyahoga River and the Ohio Canal. See entry numbers 94,98,104,and 105.

94. Ward Six (Cleveland)1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Six. For a description see Wards Six, Fourteen, and Fifteen, 1870, entry number 92. Also see entry number 91.

95. Ward Seven (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Eight. See entry numbers 92 and 97.

97. Ward Eight (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Eight. For a description see Ward Eight, 1870, entry number 96. Also see entry number 92.

98. Ward Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen. Also see entry numbers 93,99,100,101,102,and 103.

99. Ward Eleven (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Eleven. For a description see Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, 1890, entry number 98. Also see entry number 100.

100. Ward Eleven (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Eleven. For a description see Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, 1890, entry number 98. Also see entry number 99.

101. Wards Twelve and Thirteen (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Twelve and Thirteen. For a description see Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, 1890, entry number 98. Also see entry numbers 102 and 103.

102. Ward Twelve (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Twelve. For a description see Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, 1890, entry number 98. Also see entry number 101.

103. Ward Thirteen (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Thirteen. For a description see Wards Nine, Ten, Eleven, Twelve, Thirteen, and Fourteen, 1890, entry number 98l. Also see entry number 101.

104. Ward Fifteen (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Fifteen. The maps also show the ten-acre lots twelve to fifteen and twenty-eight to thirty-five which comprise Woodland Cemetery. Also see entry number 105.

105. Wards Fifteen, Sixteen, Seventeen, and Eighteen (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Sixteen an Seventeen. See entry numbers 104, 106, 107, 108, and 109.

106. Wards Sixteen and Seventeen (Cleveland) 1870. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Wards Sixteen and Seventeen. See entry numbers 105, 107, and 108.

107. Ward Sixteen (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers contained in Ward Sixteen. For a description see Wards Sixteen and Seventeen, 1870, entry number 106. Also see entry number 105.

108. Ward Seventeen (Cleveland) 1880. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Seventeen. For a description see Wards Sixteen and Seventeen , 1870, entry number 106. Also see entry number 105.

109. Ward Eighteen (Cleveland) 180. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Eighteen, The area included in Ward Eighteen in 1880 was formerly the very south part of Newburgh Village and was annexed to the village of Cleveland on October 20, 1874. See entry number 105.

110. Ward Nineteen (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Nineteen. See Ward Nineteen, West Part 1890, entry number 111.

111. Ward Nineteen, West Part (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in the west part of Ward Nineteen. See Ward Nineteen, 1890, entry number 110.

112. Ward Twenty-one (Cleveland) 1890. One volume. The maps in this volume are arranged by the original lot numbers in Ward Twenty-one.

 


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